Transactions of the Asiatic Society of Japan. The very first kitsune who openly severed his ties with the kitsune pantheon. The Zenko Kitsune (善狐 “good foxes”) are the foxes that follow Inari, the Shinto deity of agriculture, harvest, rise and fertility… Researcher Inoue Enryō in his Yōkaigaku Kōgi (妖怪學講義), quotes a newspaper article regarding the kanko, in which it is a tiny, mouse-sized creature which hails from Shinano Province. [2] It is said that the kudagitsune, following the master's will, would procure goods from other families, so a family that keeps and raises a kudagitsune would gradually grow wealthy, but it is also said that although the family does grow wealthy at first,[3] the kudagitsune would multiply until there were 75 of them, and so they would eventually eat away at the family's wealth making them decline.[2]. Its use is described in various books, as follows: In the Sōzan Chomon Kishū (想山著聞奇集) the kuda-gitsune is described as a rat-sized fox which can be kept in a pipe. They eat only what foxes are believed to like--tofu, aburage, azukimeshi, etc.--and they eat a great deal, alleging that not they, but the possessing foxes, are hungry, ." They do this by confusing their targets by creating phantom sounds and sights, stealing from them, or otherwise humiliating them publicly through trickery or even possession. In Japan, Kitsune can be both male and female, though the females are still vastly more common. They are fond of fried tofu. Mysterious illusory fires and strange lights in the sky are said to be caused by their magic, and are known as kitsunebi, or "fox fire.". Most tales of kitsune are about foxes punishing wicked priests, greedy merchants, and boastful drunkards. After growing the 8th tail the fox struggled for ages to get the final one but to his efforts brought no results. Another name for them is "izuna" (飯綱, meaning least weasel), and psychics in Niigata, the Chūbu region, and the Kantō region and "izuna-tsukai" (飯綱使い, "izuna-users") in Shinshū have these and use them to gain supernatural powers and make divinations. Kuda-gitsune or Kanko (管狐, "pipe fox") is a creature supposedly employed by Japanese kitsune-tsukai, those who use foxes as spirit familiars. Folktales of China tell of fox spirits called húli jīng (Chinese: 狐狸精) that may have up to nine tails; these were adopted into Japanese culture as kyūbi no kitsune ('nine-tailed fox') which is covered in more detail below). The fox was believed to enter the body of its victim, typically a young woman, beneath her fingernails or through her breasts. Like many aspects of Japanese culture, the Kitsune were inspired by Chinese, who told tales of magical, nine-tailed foxes called huli jing.Kitsune first debuted in Japanese literature in the eighth century, and their legend has never faded since. Kitsunetsuki (also written kitsune-tsuki) literally means the state of being possessed by a fox. It can be tamed and kept in a pocket or sleeve, and uses its supernatural power to seek out assorted information which it then whispers to its master. Many of the earliest surviving stories are recorded in the Konjaku Monogatarishū, an 11th-century Japanese collection of Japanese, Chinese, and Indian literary narratives. In many legends, kudagitsune do not possess an individual, but instead a family, and it is thought that one particular trait that they have is that unlike the osaki that would do things on its own even if its master did not will it, the kudagitsune is to be "used" by its master and does as its master wills it to do. In Japan, kitsunetsuki was a common diagnosis for insanity as recently as the early 20th century. Most tales of kitsune are about foxes punishing wicked priests, greedy merchants, and boastful drunkards. The origin of this practice is traced back to a yamabushi who obtained this art while undergoing strict asceticism on Mount Kinpu. Whereas, a drawing by Matsura Seizan in the early/mid-nineteenth century, depicts a kuda-gitsune that greatly resembles the masked palm civet. Prick it with a needle, and it glides instantly to another place. In order to grow more he resorted to consorting with one 'human wu-jen' who brewed strange if potent concoctions from the blood of the dragons he slew. To add a page to this category, add [[Category:Kitsune]] to the bottom of the page. Sometimes they lie down and froth at the mouth, and yelp as a fox yelps. Kitsune can make themselves appear to be humans, usually with mischief – or worse – in mind. Nogitsune's are benevolent, celestial foxes associated with the god Inari, sometimes called Inari foxes, or Yako ( meaning, "field foxes", commonly referred to as nogitsune), mischievous or even malicious foxes. Most tales of kitsune are about foxes punishing wicked priests, greedy merchants, and boastful drunkards. Attack!". Certain mental disorders have been attributed to possession by kitsune (known as kitsune-tsuki). 36 (3): 122–124..mw-parser-output cite.citation{font-style:inherit}.mw-parser-output .citation q{quotes:"\"""\"""'""'"}.mw-parser-output .id-lock-free a,.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-free a{background:linear-gradient(transparent,transparent),url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/6/65/Lock-green.svg")right 0.1em center/9px no-repeat}.mw-parser-output .id-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .id-lock-registration a,.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-registration a{background:linear-gradient(transparent,transparent),url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/d6/Lock-gray-alt-2.svg")right 0.1em center/9px no-repeat}.mw-parser-output .id-lock-subscription a,.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-subscription a{background:linear-gradient(transparent,transparent),url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/aa/Lock-red-alt-2.svg")right 0.1em center/9px no-repeat}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration{color:#555}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription span,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration span{border-bottom:1px dotted;cursor:help}.mw-parser-output .cs1-ws-icon a{background:linear-gradient(transparent,transparent),url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/4/4c/Wikisource-logo.svg")right 0.1em center/12px no-repeat}.mw-parser-output code.cs1-code{color:inherit;background:inherit;border:none;padding:inherit}.mw-parser-output .cs1-hidden-error{display:none;font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-visible-error{font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-maint{display:none;color:#33aa33;margin-left:0.3em}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration,.mw-parser-output .cs1-format{font-size:95%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-left,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-left{padding-left:0.2em}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-right,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-right{padding-right:0.2em}.mw-parser-output .citation .mw-selflink{font-weight:inherit}, Learn how and when to remove this template message, Illustration of a Kuda-kitsune emerging from a pipe, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Kuda-gitsune&oldid=984063717, Articles needing additional references from November 2011, All articles needing additional references, Articles containing Japanese-language text, Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License, This page was last edited on 17 October 2020, at 23:15. Kitsunetsuki (also written kitsune-tsuki) literally means the state of being possessed by a fox. Sometimes entire families were shunned by their communities after a member of the family was believed to be possessed. Appearance: Nogitsune, also frequently called yako, are a type of kitsune—magical foxes found in East Asian folklore. Japanese fox legends had their origins in the fox spirit of Chinese mythology, also found in stories throughout East Asia. It then possessed the girl again and attacked the priest, who "killed" it using okiyome, the practice of a kind of purifying ray from the hands. For months after, the girl would attack the priest, screaming "Attack! If a page is in this category, it does not need to be in the "Yokai" category. It can be considered a form of clinical lycanthropy. The fox was believed to enter the body of its victim, typically a young woman, beneath her fingernails or through her breasts. Sometimes it is told to be a type of kitsune-tsuki and depending on the region, families that have kudagitsune could sometimes be called "kuda-mochi" ("kuda"-haver), "kuda-ya" ("kuda"-proprietor),[2] "kuda-tsukai" ("kuda"-user),[2] and "kuda-shō"[4] and be detested. According to the Zen'an Zuihitsu (善庵随筆) the kanko is a fox the size of a weasel or rat, with vertical eyes and thin hair. Some of the symptoms of kitsunetsuki are cravings for rice or sweet red beans, listlessness, restlessness, and an aversion to eye contact. They do this by confusing their targets by creating phantom sounds and sights, stealing from them, or otherwise humiliating them publicly through trickery or even possession.

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