The horror film says: Wait Jack, it ain’t that easy. Story cuts to a close-up of the man’s face behind his glasses, and we sense that there’s an entire film, or book, in those wounded, sensitive eyes. These torrid trysts mostly take place in the woods, on bare soil or parked motorcycles, and involve piss, ass-eating, and face-spitting. Nolasco alternates between explicitly sexual, neon-colored sequences that veer toward complete dreamscapes and the kind of European-film-festival-courting realism that Brazilian cinema is known for. Counterintuitively, Sorogoyen has plunked the short, unchanged, at the start of his feature-length adaptation, which then diverges from it radically in pacing and tone without sacrificing the coherence of the feature as a whole, like an explosion followed by silence. Story, the inaugural recipient of DOC’s New Visions Award, delivers an immersive, absorbing, and damning film. The remainder of the film trades rapid-fire dialogue for quiet, painterly compositions, making it something of a spiritual successor to Michelangelo Antonioni’s L’Avventura and Alain Resnais’s Last Year at Marienbad. Perhaps the best tack is that of Sam Neill’s driven-mad investigator, pictured in the film’s final frames hooting at images of himself projected in an abandoned movie theater. The good horror film insists on the humanity that’s inextinguishable even by severe atrocity. Dracula has “crossed oceans of time” to find Mina, and Coppola shows how the cinematically preternatural similarly finds and seduces audiences—how movies offer their own sparkle of immortality. Annie’s (Jane Lowry) near murder, when she’s stabbed on the stairway, is framed in a prismatic image, with a mirror reflecting the assault back on itself and suggesting, once again, the intense insularity of this world. Subtlety isn’t Baroni’s aim, which is clear in the film’s social media-like sense of pace and aesthetic bells and whistles, as well as in the obvious trans metaphor built into the narrative premise. A children’s e-book called Misunderstood Monsters keeps appearing on the screen of Oliver’s digital devices, claiming that the monster just wants a friend, and that he’ll be loosed upon the physical world once the story has been read all the way through. Keith Watson, Near the conclusion of Häxan, an intertitle asks: “The witch no longer flies away on her broom over the rooftops, but isn’t superstition still rampant among us?” Such a rhetorical question is in keeping with the implications of Benjamin Christensen’s eccentric historical crawl through representations of evil. The title isn’t figurative, as Story films several landscapes across the country, slowing our rushed biorhythms and inspiring us to home in on hypnotically prolonged details. Despite being one of Bava’s simpler works, or perhaps because of that very reason, A Bay of Blood has proven to be the foremost progenitor of the slasher film, the one in which the Jason Voorheeses and Ghostfaces owe their blade of choice to. Rodrigo Sorogoyen’s 2017 short Madre didn’t just make the most of its constraints, it embraced them. This meditative and handsomely-shot essay on the ineffectiveness of America’s punitive system subtly transfixes and absorbs the viewer. It’s a blunt but potent illustration of how migrants’ feelings of displacement can emerge in different ways, often violently and self-destructively. Whether or not the answer surprises us during these cynical times, the aftermath is as disarming as it is disturbing. The plaintive plain-spokenness of Story’s interviewees, the way they matter-of-factly speak of atrocity, is transcendent and intensely haunting. Moreover, the seemingly genuine piety of the anti-wolf and anti-pagan Lord Protector muddies an otherwise villainous portrait with an arc that projects neither hypocrisy nor redemption clearly. Directed by Brett Story, this non-fiction film tries to explain how mass incarceration has affected America's towns, lifestyles and economy. Failures. Alice and her dad have to move down south because he wants to develop a new fragrance using pine cones local to the region, whose fruit only comes out if the person blowing through the cone has discovered the pine cone’s real essence. And why is death our greatest fear? Dies geschieht in Ihren Datenschutzeinstellungen. Outside the city’s walls, the forest is inundated with them, and the Lord Protector (Simon McBurney) needs to put his farmers safely to work. Sie können Ihre Einstellungen jederzeit ändern. With only seven-and-a-half minutes, on average, to make an impression, Story and her d.p., Maya Bankovic, make concise statements through carefully composed and often dreamily stylized images. The unresolved trauma that strips away at this family’s defenses is horrifyingly manifested when they finally move into their designated low-income housing, and struggle to navigate a foreign culture that insists on assimilation. Before this horrific event is even resolved, Weekes again cuts away to reveal that this is neither a prologue nor a flashback, but rather the vivid nightmare of a Sudanese man, Bol (Sope Dirisu), reliving the terror of a night he experienced a year earlier alongside his wife, Rial (Wunmi Mosaku), and daughter, Nyagak (Malaika Wakoli-Abigaba). The book opens with 2007’s There Will Be Blood (the director’s fifth film) and penultimately concludes with 2002’s contemporary-set Punch-Drunk Love, Anderson’s final (to date) curdled valentine to San Fernando Valley, as well as his first psychodrama with a loner at its center. Story’s crew speaks with one ex-con in passing, a young-looking, attractive guy who casually mentions that he did nearly 30 years in the pen. But as Bill scours the forest for his prey, his restless daughter, Robyn (Honor Kneafsey), sneaks off to explore the area and is promptly attacked and bitten by a wolf who’s actually a girl, Mebh (Eva Whittaker), and whose spirit takes on lupine form while her human body sleeps. This region is where Jeffrey Epstein allegedly outright purchased a young woman, Nadia Marcinko, and where Donald Trump’s third wife (whom Epstein claimed to have introduced to the Donald) hails from as well. The film isn’t nostalgic, as it argues that the past is awful, and that the present a delicious miracle. All rights reserved. In it, Laugier suggests that there’s no way to escape from the pain of the exclusively physical reality of his film. After being sentenced to a gulag for disgracing his country with his prior film, Borat is offered by former Kazakh President Nursultan Nazarbayev (Dani Popescu) a chance to redeem himself by traveling to America and gifting Vice President Mike Pence with the locally famous simian porn star Johnny the Monkey. It’s no surprise, then, that cracks about Epstein and jokes about Melania being Trump’s golden-caged slave are frequent in the film. Borat, like practically all satirically minded comedy in the Trump era, has been swallowed up into the all-consuming maw of electoral politics. Digital issues available via Magzter and Zinio. Such moments hammer home the unnerving simplicity of the premise, likening drug addiction to volunteer parasitism, rendering self-violation relatable via its inherently paradoxical alien-ness. Jean Genet and Marisa don’t toast to their kids because they’re decent human beings fighting heterosexual patriarchy, but for being the “devilish bitch” and “dirty-mouthed trans” that they are. Thriller That Lacks Self-Awareness, Review: The Third Day Leans Heavily on Mystery at the Expense of Human Drama, Review: We Are Who We Are Perceptively Homes in on the Malleability of Boundaries, NewFest 2020: Dry Wind and Alice Júnior Take Aim at the Patriarchy in Brazil, Watch: Lady Gaga’s “911” Music Video Is a Surreal Death Dream, On the Rocks Trailer: A Father-Daughter Journey Through the City that Never Sleeps, Listen: Dua Lipa Elevates “Levitating” with Help from Madonna and Missy Elliott, Review: Billie Eilish’s “My Future” Is an Unexpectedly Upbeat Tribute to Isolation, Blu-ray Review: Clint Eastwood’s High Plains Drifter on KL Studio Classics, Review: John Sturges’s Joe Kidd on Kino Lorber Studio Classics Blu-ray, Review: Daughters of Darkness Gets 4K UHD Uplift from Blue Underground, Blu-ray Review: Henry King’s The Gunfighter on the Criterion Collection, Review: Solid Metal Nightmares: The Films of Shinya Tsukamoto on Arrow Blu-ray, In Ivo van Hove’s Hands, West Side Story’s Actors Are Mice in A Cinematic Maze, Review: Hamlet at St. Ann’s Warehouse Is a Triumph of Production Over Performance, Confessions of a Drag Legend: Charles Busch on The Confession of Lily Dare, Review: Timon of Athens Takes Arms Against the Ravages of Wealth, Under the Radar 2020: The Shadow Whose Prey the Hunter Becomes, Not I, & More, Adam Nayman’s Paul Thomas Anderson Masterworks Honors PTA’s Ambiguities, Bestiary Poetically Raises a Coming-of-Age Tale to the Level of Myth, Glenn Kenny’s Made Men: The Story of Goodfellas Is a Stellar Anatomy of a Film, The Appointment Is a Bitterly Comic Unburdening of a Conscience, For Stephen King, As Well As His Fans, If It Bleeds Is a Coming Home. Editor’s Note: Click here for a list of the titles that made the original 2013 incarnation of our list. Story returns to the street where Michael Brown was shot in Ferguson, Mo., but puts that incident — and the Black Lives Matter movement — in the context of St. Louis County, where poor African-Americans are constantly fending off police harassment and steep municipal fines.

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